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The opportunity of the mini hydroelectric


Mini hydroelectric as a resource to be exploited. In Italy there is a network of irrigation canals that could be used for the production of electricity through small plants, but sufficient to power local networks of homes and industries. Of course, in some situations it could also be possible to create channels from scratch by adding the production of energy from mini hydroelectric with the enlargement of irrigated areas, but already the exploitation of the existing would be a great thing.

L'hydroelectric it has practically always been a clean and renewable source of energy. The scenarios for large plants have been exhausted, in recent times interest has focused on small and very small plants, the so-called mini hydroelectric, and on existing irrigation channels. Also because this form of intervention, when it is conceived on existing canals, enjoys interesting and preferential forms of incentive since it promotes a multiple intelligent use of water.

Something is moving and the theme of the mini hydroelectric it becomes more and more interesting. The latest news is the signing of a memorandum of understanding between asoRinnovabili and the National Association of Reclamation and Irrigation ANBI for the start of a collaboration aimed at promoting and encouraging the installation of type mini hydroelectric on existing irrigation canals. Collaboration means that both associations will make available their experts who will have the task of facing and overcoming above all the administrative and financial obstacles they encounter.

In creating a plant mini hydroelectric for the production of electricity the difficulties encountered are on the one hand technical, on the other bureaucratic and financial. The protocol underlying the agreement between ace Rinnovabili and ANBI aims on the one hand to encourage the spread of 'good practices' so as to avoid as much as possible unproductive approaches from an industrial point of view, and on the other to simplify environmental assessment procedures.

Simplification is needed because bureaucracy stifles the initiative. Today's paradox, as was underlined during the conference 'Hydroelectric on irrigation canals, an opportunity to be seized 'which took place in recent days in Rome, is that the simple replacement of a dissipating valve with a turbine is subject to an environmental impact assessment, which is a long and expensive procedure.

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