Recipes

Moor (heather): properties and benefits


The heather it is similar to heather and is often mistaken for it - both belong to the botanical family of ericaceae - but it is not theheather rosea of the Alps (very rare) and not even the ashy heather or the more Mediterranean arboreal heather.

The heather, family of ericaceae, belongs to the genus 'calluna' and to be precise it is called 'calluna vulgar', also known as grecchia, brentolo and, precisely, heather. It blooms in autumn and covers the meadows of the pre-alpine granite areas with its lilac-purple color, where it grows abundantly and forms a thick and soft carpet, but it is also found in lowland meadows.

Properties and benefits of heather. This plant as well as theheather it is considered a cure-all against rheumatism when it is used for complete baths, sitz baths, hand baths or foot baths several times a day. It is also indicated to get rid of the excesses of uric acid due both to the inactive functioning of the kidneys and to stones. In addition to its diuretic and purifying action, theheather it is considered a good help in cases of urinary tract infection.

Harvesting and cultivation of heather. It is harvested in autumn (towards the end) and is found abundantly at the edge of the woods and in uncultivated meadows. The flowers must be collected when they are still in bud and are kept for a long time hanging in bunches in some corner of the house. If you want to have it in the garden, heather can be sown in spring in a sandy soil rich in humus.

Preparations based on heather. For urinary tract infections and in particular for cystitis, the most used remedy is decoction: a generous handful of flowers in a liter of water to boil for five minutes. For the bath, you can throw a handful of heather into the tub, while for hand baths and foot baths, two handfuls of heather are used per basin of water.

The recipe for a 'complex infusion' indicated for genitourinary tract disorders includes 3 pinches of heather, 2 of lime bark and 2 of thyme in a bowl of boiling water. Every night for a week.


Video: Heather on the Yorkshire Moors (October 2020).