Do-it-yourself

Hazardous waste in the home: how to manage it?


In almost all homes there is a good amount of toxic substances and dangerous for health in the form of detergents, paints, thinners, insecticides, cleaning products in general and much more. As long as they are used, it is to be hoped sparingly, these substances are simply pollutants; when they are no longer needed they become Hazardous waste.

What to do with it? How to responsibly manage that real domestic chemical bomb represented by Hazardous waste? Here are some tips that may come in handy.

Paints. In this first group we put oil colors and bleaches, mordants and preservatives; but also polishes for furniture, floors and metals.

  • These products should not be disposed of superficially, or even their containers when they are empty but dirty. You need to take them to an authorized hazardous waste collection center, which is normally managed by the municipality. Is it miles away? Never mind, there is no other way to get rid of these Hazardous waste in an environmentally sustainable way. If none exist, press for a collection center to be established.

Detergents. Let's talk about those based on ammonia, bleach, oven cleaners, mothballs and disinfectants.

  • They should not be thrown or poured down the drain, but used up to the last in order to then be able to eliminate the containers together with household waste according to the rules of separate collection. If it is not possible to use the contents in full, these products should be kept until the time of collection Hazardous waste.

Batteries, lubricating oil, transmission fluid.

  • They need to be taken to an authorized recovery center. There are special containers for pocket batteries, while car batteries (which are dangerous objects) must be delivered to the staff of the collection center. Some service stations and repair shops also function as a collection center.

Water paints. These are those normally used to paint the interior of the house. Unlike paints, paints have a predominantly watery composition and are less polluting, indeed sometimes they are not.

  • They are dried and solidified in the air and then the containers are disposed of together with other household waste.

Thinners and turpentine.

  • They should be kept in tightly closed jars, letting the contaminants settle, then the diluent is filtered with fine mesh gauze muslin and the liquid is reused. The deposit that remains must be solidified and then eliminated together with Hazardous waste

Maybe you may also be interested in: Recycle waste at home


Video: Proper Disposal of Household Hazardous Waste Explainer Video (October 2020).